Immigration BLOG

Birthright Citizenship

With President Trump’s recent announcement on his plans to end birthright citizenship through an executive order, questions have arisen in recent news as to both the underlying reasons and the practical implementation of such a declaration. President Trump asserts that the U.S. is “the only country in the world where a person comes in and has a baby, and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States.” While it is true that the majority of the world’s nations do not offer automatic citizenship to those born within their borders, there are at least 30 other countries, including Canada and Mexico, where children born on their soil are granted automatic birthright citizenship. On the other hand, over the past few decades, countries that once did so, including Australia and the U.K., have repealed those policies, with others considering changes. Children born in the U.S. are granted automatic birthright citizenship…
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Invisible Wall

The term “invisible wall” is a well-known term among immigration attorneys. While the current administration calls for the construction of a physical wall, the administration has already erected an invisible wall which appears to reduce and discourage, not only illegal immigration, but legal immigration as well. While one of the stated goals of the administration is to reduce regulations in order to promote businesses, there is one area where the reverse appears to be taking place. In the field of skills-based immigration law, the administration’s new policies, guidelines, and rules are making it more difficult for American businesses to bring necessary talent to the United States. This is being accomplished through new bureaucratic obstacles and excessive requirements that deter American corporations from bringing engineers, software and computer specialists, and other technical personnel, to the United States. Although the administration is framing these regulations as a necessary measure to protect U.S….
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Temporary Protected Status

On October 3, 2018, Federal Judge Edward M. Chen presiding over the United States District Court of the Northern District of California made a groundbreaking decision to grant a preliminary injunction to beneficiaries of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Sudan. Temporary Protected Status, established by Congress in the Immigration Act of 1990, is a designation given by the Secretary of Homeland Security to countries that have been destabilized by catastrophe (war, natural disaster, epidemics, etc.) During the time that the Secretary of Homeland Security designates a country for TPS, TPS beneficiaries are not removable from the United States, can obtain employment authorization, and can be granted travel authorization. TPS grants protections to over 300,000 people in the U.S. from El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, Nepal, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. Through the end of 2017 and beginning of 2018, the Trump administration announced…
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